Work and Organizational Psychology


 

 
Work and Organizational Psychology (also known as industrial-organizational psychology, W&O psychology, organizational psychology, occupational psychology, personnel psychology) applies psychology to organizations and the workplace,. the performance and well-being of its people. A W&O psychologist researches and identifies how behaviors and attitudes can be improved through hiring practices, training programs, and feedback systems. Work and Organizational Psychology (also known as industrial-organizational psychology, W&O psychology, organizational psychology, occupational psychology, personnel psychology) applies psychology to organizations and the workplace,. the performance and well-being of its people.

 

 
A W&O psychologist researches and identifies how behaviors and attitudes can be improved through hiring practices, training programs, and feedback systems.

 

 

What does an occupational psychologist do?

The expertise of a Chartered Occupational Psychologist lies in identifying and realising the full potential of people and creating effective organisations. No listing of the fields of occupational psychology is ever perfect or complete, as any area where psychology can contribute to the understanding and assistance of human beings at work (and increasingly on the borderlines before and after work, and between work and leisure) may raise the need for investigation, or may find an application for some advance in the wider field of psychology. Members of the Division are required to establish their competence in several fields (not necessarily all); breadth is valued so that the initial diagnosis of a problem is not undertaken by too narrow a specialist. It also follows that very few people are equally competent in everything right across the board.
Occupational psychologists achieve their objectives by:  

  • identifying abilities and potential - through using tests and job-relevant exercises at selection, and in career counselling
  • motivating people - in designing payment and reward systems, and advising on health and safety issues

assessing performance both on and off the job - in designing appraisal systems, advising on stress management, and in designing machines and computer systems that are easy to use helping people and organisations adapt to change - examining the effects of unemployment, advising on how to change attitudes and behaviours to improve customer service designing effective organisations - advising on the best type of management systems, identifying effective human resources strategies, and designing jobs to fit peoples' skills.

 

CROB's expertise


 

CROB’s faculty and researchers have been occupied professionally to various projects regarding organizational psychology in fields such as:

 

  • Job performance
  • Job analysis
  • Personnel recruitment and selection
  • Performance appraisal
  • Individual assessment (knowledge, skills, and ability testing, personality assessment, work sample tests, assessment centers)
  • Psychometrics
  • Work motivation
  • Job attitudes (e.g., job satisfaction, commitment, organizational citizenship, and retaliation)
  • Organizational development (OD)
  • Organizational research methods   
  • Organizational surveys

The long lasting set of skills and competencies of the faculty and the experience they have obtained  both professionally and academically through their careers, displays total fit with the psychological part of human resources management. Finally, all the members of the laboratory are characterized for their professional ethos and their research integrity from national and international partnerships and cooperations (universities, research centres, research projects, research partners-coordinators

 

Organizational Psychology useful links


1.    http://www.wcupa.edu/_Academics/sch_cas.psy/Career_Paths/Industrial/Career06.htm

2.    http://users.ugent.be/~flievens/op.htm

3.    http://frank.mtsu.edu/~pmccarth/

4.    http://www.socialpsychology.org/io.htm

5.    http://www.workpsychologyarena.com/

6.    http://www.intute.ac.uk/socialsciences/cgi-bin/browse.pl?id=121071

7.    http://psychology.about.com/od/psychologycareerprofiles/p/iopsychcareers.htm

8.    http://www.siop.org/

9.    http://www.psychology.uwaterloo.ca/positions/industrial%20organizational.html

10. http://www.nyt-om-arbejdsliv.dk/2omtale.aspx?itemID=145

11. http://www.psychologymajors.com/industrial-and-organizional-psychology-schools

12. http://www.ru.nl/workandorganizationalpsychology/

 

Organizational Psychology useful bibliography


1.    Anderson, N., Ones, D. S., Sinangil, H. K., & Viswesvaran, C. (Eds.). (2002). Handbook of industrial, work and organizational psychology, Volume 1: Personnel psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Ltd.

2.    Anderson, N., Ones, D. S., Sinangil, H. K., & Viswesvaran, C. (Eds.). (2002). Handbook of industrial, work and organizational psychology, Volume 2: Organizational psychology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications Ltd.

3.    Borman, W. C., Ilgen, D., R., & Klimoski, R., J. (Eds.). (2003). Handbook of psychology: Vol 12 Industrial and organizational psychology. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

4.    Borman, W. C., & Motowidlo, S. J. (1993). Expanding the criterion domain to include elements of contextual performance. Chapter in N. Schmitt and W. C. Borman (Eds.), Personnel Selection. San Francisco: Josey-Bass (pp. 71-98).

5.    Campbell, J. P., Gasser, M. B., & Oswald, F. L. (1996). The substantive nature of job performance variability. In K. R. Murphy (Ed.), Individual differences and behavior in organizations (pp. 258–299). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

6.    Copley, F. B. (1923). Frederick W. Taylor father of scientific management, Vols. I and II. New York: Taylor Society.

7.    Dunnette, M. D. (Ed.). (1976). Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology. Chicago: Rand McNally.

8.    Dunnette, M. D., & Hough, L. M. (Eds.). (1991). Handbook of industrial/organizational psychology (4 Volumes). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

9.    Guion, R. M. (1998). Assessment, measurement and prediction for personnel decisions. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

10.  Hunter, J. E., & Schmidt, F. L. (1990). Methods of meta-analysis: Correcting error and bias in research findings. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

11.  Koppes, L. L. (Ed.). (2007). Historical perspectives in industrial and organizational psychology. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

12.  Lant, T.K, “Organizational Cognition and Interpretation,” in Baum, (Ed)., The Blackwell Companion to Organizations. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.

13.  Lowman, R. L. (Ed.). (2002). The California School of Organizational Studies handbook of organizational consulting psychology: A comprehensive guide to theory, skills and techniques. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

14.  Rogelberg, S., G. (Ed.). (2002). Handbook of research methods in industrial and organizational psychology. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

15.  Sackett, P. R., & Wilk, S. L. (1994). Within group norming and other forms of score adjustment in pre-employment testing. American Psychologist, 49, 929-954.

16.  Schmidt, F. L., & Hunter, J. E. (1998). The validity and utility of selection methods in personnel psychology: Practical and theoretical implications of 85 years of research findings. Psychological Bulletin, 124, 262-274.

 

 

 

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